Tag Archives: sunday food

This little piggy

8 Sep

Went to the market too many times! Or for cholesterol at least. Today’s post is all about Eisbein. Yes, you read it. That piece of meat and meal that most are afraid of ordering at a restaurant if they see it on a menu,because they either think people will perceive them as gluttonous or because they  just can’t see themselves finishing such a big piece of meat. 
Well let me tell you, everyone wants a bit of crackling, fatty,juicy and falling off the bone Eisbein. I make it quite often. Why, you ask? Uhm, because it tastes fantastically incredible and also, how can something that is SO cheap taste SO good?! Double win! 

It is also a dish that really requires minimum effort. You can go about your tasks and things while it’s cooking. So, what’s the catch you ask?

Well, the cleaning of that one saucepan that you boiled it in… but not to worry, your man in your life wouldn’t mind doing it for you.. or, if you have children.. start them young.. teaching them the tricks of the trade! My lion of a man still thanks me gratefully each time for his Eisbein and he’s perfectly happy to do the dishes then šŸ˜ƒ

People, it’s time to start climbing the stairwell to heaven!  Take that napkin and tuck it into your shirt’s collar, because you are going to eat till your chin and lips glisten! 

Ingredients 

1 X Eisbein / pork shank  person ( 2 for me and the lion) 

1 X cup of white wine vinegar

1 X teaspoon of whole peppercorns

1 X big pinch of rock salt for the water

4-5 bay leaves

1 X onion, roughly quartered, you can even keep the skin on 

700ml of boiling water from the kettle or enough to cover your pork shanks

2 X small pinches of rock salt 

As I’ve mentioned, it’s really easy and no fuss. Get the biggest saucepan or casserole dish you have – as long as it is deep enough for the shanks to be covered in water, then you’re good to go. I use my biggest Le Creuset  casserole baby that I have! 

Place the shanks in the saucepan, add all the ingredients and pour the boiling water over. Bring it to boil and then turn the heat down. Allow to simmer on a low heat for at least 3 hours.

After three hours,test the meat, almost like you would a cake. You’ll easily be able to tell if it’s cooked to the texture where it is nice and tender. I usually simmer mine for 4 1/2 hours, just because the shanks are so huge! If you think they’re ready, preheat your oven to 220 degrees. 

Carefully remove the shanks from the saucepan. This needs to be done with care,otherwise the piece of fat that is on top will slide and fall off and this is one of the most delicious parts of an Eisbein. 

Place on a lined baking tray. Gently pat the fat lightly with a thick paper towel, making sure the part with the fat is facing upward. 

Take a sharp knife and carefully score the fat. You don’t want to cut it through completely,only half way.

Sprinkle a pinch of the rock salt over each shank, focussing on the section where the fat is. All you do now is place it in the oven for about 45 minutes or until crispy! 

For the weary ones, you’ll hear loud “pop” sounds, almost like microwave popcorn. Don’t worry,this is simply the fat that is crisping up. 

Since Eisbein is so rich, I just want a refreshing,green salad, but then again, my Austrian friend Ulrike and her hubby will eat it the traditional way, with sauerkraut.Ending this off, I dedicate this recipe to my friend, the Scroobys, enjoy guys! 



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